Voice/Vision Holocaust Survivor Oral History Archive

Interviews - Original format video



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Adler, Marton July 13, 1989

Marton Adler was born in 1929 in Volové, a village in Sub Carpathian Ruthenia. He was the oldest child and had two brothers and a sister. His village was occupied by Hungarians in 1939 when he was ten years old. Marton's father was conscripted into a labor unit in Russia from 1941 until the end of 1942. Eventually the family lost their store due to the "Jewish" laws. The Germans occupied the area in March of 1944 and soon after the family was deported, first to a ghetto in Sokirnitsa and then to Auschwitz where his mother and siblings were gassed. Marton and his father were sent to Buchenwald and then to Dora where his father was killed. Marton was eventually liberated by the British from Bergen-Belsen.

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Original Format: video   OCLC#: 33345371

Baker, Ella May 11, 2011

A joint project between Portraits of Honor: Our Michigan Holocaust Survivors, the Program for Holocaust Survivors and Families, and the Voice/Vision Archive.

Ella Baker was born in Vysni Apsa, Czechoslovakia on August 31, 1924 but grew up in Cop, Slovakia. After the German occupation of Hungary in March 1944, Ella and her parents were taken to the Uzhorod ghetto where they were held until being transported Auschwitz-Birkenau. Once there, she was separated from her parents whom she never saw again. While in the camp, Ella worked as a slave laborer making airplane parts. In 1945, Ella was sent on a death march out of the camp, but was forced to return to help clean up after a Russian bombardment. It was there that she was liberated by the Russians and went back to Czechoslovakia and then to Israel in 1948. She left Israel and came to Detroit in 1956 and has been very active within her community in championing Jewish rights and the rights of the mentally ill. She is also a cancer survivor and despite the tragic events in her life she remains positive and optimistic. Her motto is: "Don't dwell on things that you cannot change and try to see what is possible without pretending. Be inquisitive and aware and challenge all unjust situations."

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Original Format: Video   OCLC#: n/a

Biegun, Miriam August 10, 1983

Miriam Biegun was born in White Russia. She and her family fled the ghetto for the Lipiczanska forest, joining the Lipiczanska Puszcza resistance when she was just four years old. In 1944, after living in the forest for three years, she and her siblings returned to Zhetl to find it in ruins. After a few months, they moved to Łódź, where her siblings went to a kibbutz and Miriam went on to Berlin by 1947. While in Germany, she was also with her aunts and uncles in Ziegenhain and Jäger-Kaserne before ultimately travelling to Israel with an aunt, uncle, and cousin and meeting her husband on the ship. The two were married in Israel before moving to Winnipeg and Windsor before finally settling down in Oak Park around 1970.

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Original Format: video   OCLC#: 810901628

Binke, Szymon June 16, 1997

Szymon Binke was born in 1931 in Łódź, Poland. Shortly after the Nazi invasion his family was moved to the city's Baluty district which became the Łódź ghetto. In 1944 the family was deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau where his mother and sister were gassed. Szymon was placed in the Kinderblock but escaped from it to join his father and uncles in the main camp of Auschwitz. Later he was transferred to a series of forced labor camps until he was liberated in May 1945.

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Original Format: video   OCLC#: 45257341

Butter, Irene Hasenberg September 22, 1986

Dr. Irene Hasenberg Butter was born in Berlin in 1930 but moved to Holland with her family in 1937. In June 1943 the family was deported, first to Westerbork, a transit camp, and then in Feb. 1944 to Bergen-Belsen. The family managed to be included in an exchange transport in early 1945, using falsified Equadorian passports. During the transport her father died. The rest of the family were released and went to North Africa and later moved to New York City after the war ended.

Original Format: video   OCLC#: 31713792

Charlupski, Franka June 18, 1985

Franka Charlupski was born in 1920 and lived with her family in Łódź, Poland. The Weintraubs were in the Łódź ghetto from 1940 until August 1944 when they were transported to Auschwitz and separated. Her mother died in Auschwitz and her father died in a labor camp. Franka and her sister spent three days in Auschwitz before being moved to a labor camp outside of Bremen, Germany. On April 7, 1945 this camp was closed and the inmates were moved to Bergen-Belsen where they were liberated by the British Army on April 15.

Original Format: video   OCLC#: 32214428

Dorfman, Mala Weintraub September 15, 2005

Mala Weintraub Dorfman was born in Łódź, Poland in 1923. When the war broke out in 1939, Mala and three of her five siblings were sent to live with their grandmother in the Kozienice ghetto. Mala worked as a nurse in the ghetto until she was deported to Skarzysko where she worked in an ammunitions factory for two years. She was then deported to Częstochowa where she was liberated a year later by the Russians. After the war, Mala returned to Łódź, married, and was soon reunited with her sisters at Bergen-Belsen. Mala lived with her husband in Germany until their immigration to the United States in 1949.

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Original Format: video   OCLC#: 70958436

Ebenstein, Noemi Engel July 22, 1996

Noemi Engel Ebenstein, born in 1941, is a child survivor of the Holocaust. In her interview she retells stories told to her by her mother about how the family survived the Holocaust. Her father was sent to a forced labor camp when Noemi was a baby. In May 1944, Noemi, her brother and mother were deported from Subotica, Yugoslavia to the camps, first to Strasshof labor and then to Moosbierbaum where they were liberated by the Soviet army.

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Original Format: video   OCLC#: 38750545

Ehrmann, Alexander May 13, 1983

Alexander Ehrmann was born in Kralovsky Chlumec, Czechoslovakia, which became part of Hungary in 1938. His family consisted of himself, his parents, two brothers and three sisters. In 1944 the family was deported to a ghetto and then to Auschwitz where his parents, a sister and her son were killed. After the uprising in the Warsaw ghetto ended, Mr. Ehrmann was transferred from Auschwitz to Warsaw with a labor group to salvage materials from the ghetto. After spending five days in Dachau, he was transferred to Mühldorf, where the inmates were building an underground aircraft factory. When the camp was evacuated, Mr. Ehrmann and other inmates were put on a train and moved back and forth in the unoccupied area until they were liberated by American troops. After the war he was reunited with two sisters and his younger brother.

Original Format: video   OCLC#: 32948524

Feldman, Manya Auster August 11, 1998

Manya was born in Dombrovitsa, Poland in 1923. Her family was orthodox and considerably large, numbering close to 200. Following the outbreak of the war in 1939, the Soviet Union occupied Dombrovitsa. Russian occupation ended however in 1941, when Germany invaded the Soviet Union and Manya's hometown fell into German hands. The Jews in Dombrovitsa immediately felt the effects of German anti-Semitic measures. In August 1942, the Germans liquidated the ghetto in Dombrovitsa and Manya, along with her father, brother and eldest sister escaped into the forest. Her mother and her two sisters remained and they were deported to the nearby town of Sarny where they were murdered. After fleeing the Germans, Manya and her remaining family joined the Kovpak partisan movement. Manya was separated from her father and siblings and spent the remainder of the war hiding in several small villages in the region and serving in different partisan units. Her father and siblings were killed in combat. Following the end of the war, Manya was placed in a DP camp in Berlin. She then emigrated to the United States.

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Original Format: video   OCLC#: 50499827

Geffen, Hilma February 15, 1985

Hilma Geffen was born in Berlin in 1925 and was an only child. Her father served in the German Army during World War I and was awarded the Iron Cross. In 1931 the family moved to Rangsdorf, a suburb of Berlin, where they were the only Jewish family in town. Her father, an accountant, continued to commute to Berlin for work. A couple of nights after Kristallnacht in 1938, SA men came to the house and smashed the furniture. In 1939 the family moved back to Berlin because Jews could no longer own property. As Hilma was returning home after work in October 1941, her mother told her to run away because people were there to pick them up. Using false papers, Hilma went underground, living with a German couple who knew only that she was Jewish. She remained "hidden" with them until the end of the war, then moved to Miami Beach where she had relatives. Her parents were deported to Auschwitz and did not survive the war.

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Original Format: video   OCLC#: 32948277

Gorman, Erna Blitzer July 12, 1989

Erna Blitzer Gorman relates her experiences as a child when she and her family were in Poland at the time of the Nazi invasion and were unable to return to their home in France. After living in various ghettos, they escaped and were hidden for more than two years in a barn by a Ukrainian farmer until the area was liberated by Russian soldiers.

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Original Format: video   OCLC#: 30743770

Gun, Jack August 12, 1999

Jack Gun was born in Rozhishche, Poland, where he lived with his father, mother and older brother and sister. Rozhishche was later annexed into the Ukraine by the Soviets at the outbreak of the war in September 1939. With the German invasion of the Soviet Union in June 1941, the Gun family was forced to move into a make-shift ghetto in the city where they were used as forced laborers. In August of 1942, the ghetto was liquidated by the Germans and Jack's father, mother and sister were killed. Jack and his brother managed to flee and received help from their father's non-Jewish friend. Upon this man's urging, Jack and his brother hid first in the woods and then in a bunker they dug in a field. After several near-misses with the occupation authorities, the two were hidden in a non-Jewish Ukrainian household where they remained until the Russians liberated the Ukraine in 1944.

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Original Format: video   OCLC#: 51670946

Hasenberg, Werner September 9, 1996

Mr. Hasenberg was born in Germany and relates his experiences growing up under the Nazi regime until his family moved to Amsterdam, Holland in 1937. In June of 1943 the family was deported to Westerbork, a transit camp, and then to Bergen-Belsen in Feb. 1944. The family managed to be included in an exchange transport in January 1945 using Ecuadorian papers made available by a family friend in Sweden. During the transport, Mr. Hasenberg's father died. After arriving in Switzerland, the rest of the family were released and briefly separated until they were reunited in New York in 1946.

Original Format: video   OCLC#: 45257480

Kahan, David August 14, 1995

Born in 1928, in Gheorgheni, Romania, David Kahan was part of a large extended family, consisting of his mother, father, several siblings, aunts, uncles and cousins. In April 1944, the Germans invaded Hungary and immediately began the full-scale persecution of Hungarian Jewry. The Kahan family was detained by Hungarian Gendarmerie and placed in a school room for several days. After their initial detainment, the family was shipped to an ad hoc ghetto in Szaszregen. The family remained incarcerated in a brick factory in Szaszregen for approximately four weeks and were then shipped to Auschwitz. Upon arrival in Auschwitz, David was separated from his family, who were gassed and David was shaved, deloused and held for future use on work details. Of the camp itself, David remembers very few details. After approximately four weeks, David was shipped to the Müldorf labor camp in Southern Germany. While there, David worked for Organization Todt, clearing trees for the construction of an underground airplane factory. David contacted typhus after he was liberated and was hospitalized in the DP Camp at Feldafing. Following his recovery, David showed no desire to return to Romania and made his way to the United States, arriving in New York in May 1949. From New York, David moved to Minneapolis and eventually made his way to Detroit in ca. 1950. He married in 1953 and had three sons. An earlier audio interview is also available: OCLC# 49392609.

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Original Format: video   OCLC#: 47933303

Karp, Alexander September 14, 1995

Alexander Karp was born in Nyirmada, Hungary and grew up in Kisvarda, Hungary. When the Germans invaded Hungary, Alexander and his family were forced into the Kisvarda ghetto. After two months in the ghetto, he was transported to Auschwitz-Birkenau and then to a camp in France to do forced labor. From there he was moved to Kochendorf and then Dachau. Alexander was liberated in Mittenwald while on a death march from Dachau. After liberation Alexander returned to Hungary before moving to Canada and then to the United States.

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Original Format: video   OCLC#: 43765781

Kent, Ruth August 7, 1984

Ruth Kent was born in Łódź, Poland and lived with her family in the Łódź ghetto until it was liquidated in 1944. The family was then sent to Auschwitz where they were separated and some family members were immediately put to death. Ruth and a sister were sent to Stutthof, a labor camp, where they were later separated. Ruth survived a forced march as the Germans evacuated the camps in the face of the advancing Russian army. She was liberated by the Russians and was reunited with two brothers after the war.

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Original Format: video   OCLC#: 31677176

Klein, Bernard & Emery May 23, 1984

The Klein brothers were born in Humenné, a town in eastern Slovakia. The immediate family of the brothers included their parents and a younger sister. The Germans occupied the area in 1939 and started to deport the Jews in 1941. The Klein family was not deported until 1944 because Mr. Klein was an important farming advisor. The family was sent to Auschwitz without Bernard, who had become separated. Mrs. Klein and her daughter were immediately gassed upon arrival at the camp. Bernard was reunited with his brother and father at Auschwitz a month later. The three were sent to Gleiwitz where Emery and his father worked in a factory while Bernard worked in the concentration camp kitchen. In 1945, as the Russian army advanced into the area, the camp was evacuated to Blechhammer, another camp in the vicinity. The German guards fled the camp, leaving the prisoners. A few days later, the brothers, their father and several others began walking back to Humenné. The Klein family moved to Israel, Montreal and eventually to Detroit.

Link to Portraits of Honor Project-Bernard Klein

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Original Format: video   OCLC#: 39155285

Krystal, Henry September 19, 1996

Henry Krystal was born in Sosnowiec, Poland in 1925. Shortly after the Nazi invasion, Henry's brother and then father escaped to the Soviet occupied zone of Poland while Henry and his mother lived in Bodzentyn, Poland. In 1942 Henry was sent to a labor camp and his mother sent to Treblinka where she died. From 1942 until the end of the war, Henry was a member of a labor Kommando sent from place to place, including Starachowice, Bobrek, Birkenau, Siemensstadt and Sachsenhausen. He worked in a factory operated by the Siemens company. At the end of the war he was in the city of Schwerin, in the British occupied zone of Germany. In 1947 Henry immigrated to Detroit, Michigan where he lived with an aunt and uncle, went to school and became a psychiatrist.

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Original Format: video   OCLC#: 45242245

Kupfer, Stefa (Sarah) Sprecher July 24, 1987

Stefa Kupfer was ten years old and living in Sanok, Poland when the war started. Her father was killed in the early days of the occupation. Stefa, her mother and young sister went into hiding instead of registering with the occupational government. Mrs. Orlewska, a Polish woman, played a significant role in their survival by hiding them in her house. They were also aided by other Poles, some of whom knew they were Jews.

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Original Format: video   OCLC#: 32158870

Lessing, Alfred January 26, 1993

Alfred Lessing recalls his experiences living with other families as a hidden child in the Netherlands during the war. He talks about the last year of the war when he was reunited and lived with his father and brothers.

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Original Format: video   OCLC#: 30754897

Lichtman, Rene August 13, 1998

Born in Paris, France in 1937, Rene is the only son of Polish immigrants who arrived in France in the 1930s. Rene's father joined the French Army shortly before the outbreak of World War Two. After the German invasion of the Benelux countries in May 1940, his father was killed in action just outside of Paris in Compiégne. After the fall of France, Rene's mother sent to him to stay with a family in the countryside and it was there that he was kept hidden from the Germans for the remainder of the war and his mother went into hiding in Paris in 1942. Although Rene and his mother survived the war, most of his maternal and paternal family members in Poland were murdered by the Germans. In 1950, Rene's mother married an American Orthodox Jew and the two moved from France to Williamsburg, New York. An audio interview from 1992 is also available: OCLC# 45257583.

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Original Format: video   OCLC#: 50502926

Liffman, Leo May 15, 1985

Leo Liffman was born and raised in Wiesbaden, Germany. He relates his experiences with anti-Semitism as a child and young adult during the closing years of the Weimar Republic and the early Hitler years. He was arrested during Kristallnacht and imprisoned for several weeks at Buchenwald concentration camp. He left Germany in 1939, leaving his parents behind, and was the only member of his family to survive the war.

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Original Format: video   OCLC#: 32948424

Manaster, Helena December 9, 1983

Born in Poland, Helena was one of eight children, all of whom were adults at the beginning of the war. After the German invasion in 1939, the family separated and Helen, along with several siblings and their father went to Lwów, which was under Soviet control at the time. In June 1941, the Germans invaded the Soviet Union and occupied Lwów. Helena's father and brothers were sent to Belzec, where they died in the gas chambers. Helena and her husband were moved to Lesko and then on to Zamosc. Because Helena's husband was a doctor, the Germans sent them to a labor camp in Rokitna. They eventually escaped and made their way to Kraków, where they remained in hiding until the end of the war.

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Original Format: video   OCLC#: 51670813

Moche, Ben April 24, 2009

A joint project between Portraits of Honor: Our Michigan Holocaust Survivors, the Program for Holocaust Survivors and Families, and the Voice/Vision Archive.

Ben Moche was born in Yas (Iasi), Romania in 1940. Although young, Ben remembers facing several incidents of anti-Semitism like being forced to wear a yellow Jewish star. In 1944, Ben's family left Romania (and all of their possessions) traveling to Hungary. After the war they moved to Austria and then to Germany. In 1947 they settled in the town of Ramle near Tel Aviv. Ben immigrated to America in 1967, settling in Michigan where he married and started a family.

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Original Format: Video   OCLC#: n/a

Offen, Nathan, Bernard, and Samuel September 3, 1987

The Offen family was from Kraków, Poland. The brothers tell stories of their life in the Kraków ghetto, Płaszów labor camp and Mauthausen concentration camp. While at Płaszów, Bernard and other children were transported out of camp, most likely to be executed. However, Bernard managed to escape and was then smuggled into another sub-camp to be with an uncle. The family was later reunited at Płaszów until they were sent to Mauthausen. After arriving at Mauthausen, Bernard and his father were separated from Sam and Nathan and sent to Auschwitz. Shortly after arriving at Auschwitz, their father was "selected" by Dr. Mengele and sent to the gas chamber. After the war, Sam and Nathan went to Italy where Bernard later found them.

Original Format: video   OCLC#: 40671915

Pasternak, Abraham August 13, 1984

Born in Betlan, Romania, Abraham Pasternak relates his experiences in Romania during the Nazi occupation and his internment in several concentration camps, including Auschwitz, Buchenwald, Theresienstadt, Schlieben (a satellite of Buchenwald) and Zeitz, a city in Germany.

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Original Format: video   OCLC#: 30831413

Roth, Nathan February 4, 1983

Nathan Roth was born in Veliky Bereznyy, Czechoslovakia. After the German annexation of the area in 1944, Nathan, along with his mother, father and eight siblings, was deported to the ghetto in Ungvár where the family was split up. From Ungvár, Nathan was deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau and then to Jaworzno, a sub-camp of Auschwitz. While he was at Jaworzno, Nathan worked for I.G. Farben, a German company operating an excavation project in the area. Nathan was liberated by the Russians while on the death march following the evacuation of the Jaworzno camp. He returned to Veliky Bereznyy after the war and emigrated to the United States in 1949.

Original Format: video   OCLC#: 51670025

Rubin, Agi December 19, 1984

Agi Rubin was born in Monkacz, a town in the part of Czechoslovakia which was annexed to Hungary in 1938. In 1944 her family was deported to Auschwitz where her mother and younger brother were killed. She worked in a sorting shed in the camp until it was evacuated in January 1945. She survived a forced march of several months duration and was liberated in Germany when she was 15 years old. She was later reunited with her father.

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Original Format: video   OCLC#: 31713928

Rubin, Zoltan January 12, 1983

Zoltan Rubin was born in Kapúsány, Czechoslovakia. He is the youngest child in a large family of eight sons and three daughters. His family was fairly well off since his father owned a large farm and several mills. Zoltan and his parents were protected from deportation by an economic exemption until 1942 when the exemption was eliminated and his parents were deported. Zoltan was able to avoid deportation by using Gentile papers given to him by friends. In 1944, he was captured with a group of partisans and sent to a prisoner-of-war camp near Jena where he was part of a forced labor detail digging tunnels for the Germans. Towards the end of the war, he escaped with three others and lived off the land for about six weeks until the American army arrived in the area. He was later reunited with an older brother who was a doctor with the Czechoslovakian army.

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Original Format: video   OCLC#: 40671802

Salomon, Leon June 18, 1990

Leon Salomon was born in Maków Mazowiecki, Poland and lived there with his family until Poland was occupied by the Germans in 1939. Leon and two of his sisters moved east to Kobylnik to live with their brother, a school teacher who was later killed when the Germans took over the area. In 1942, the Jewish residents of the town were executed by the Germans in a nearby forest. As Leon was being taken away to be shot, he escaped from the guards and hid in the forest. Leon was the only member of his immediate family to survive and eventually joined a partisan group fighting in the Vilna and White Russia area. He joined the Soviet Army near the end of the war and fought with them until he was wounded in east Prussia.

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Original Format: video   OCLC#: 32233253

Schey, Vera June 10, 1994

An interview with Vera Schey, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. Vera Schey was born in Budapest, Hungary. An only child whose father died before the war, Vera and her mother survived the German annexation of Hungary in 1944 by obtaining false identifications and papers. During the last months of the war, the two hid in several different locations in and around Budapest, separating and reuniting on several occasions. Vera left Hungary for the United States in 1946.

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Original Format: video   OCLC#: 55895350

Schreiber, Judy February 1, 2013

A joint project between Portraits of Honor: Our Michigan Holocaust Survivors, the Program for Holocaust Survivors and Families, and the Voice/Vision Archive.



Judy Schreiber was born in Prague, Czechoslovakia on December 29, 1938. She lived in Prague until the age of three when she and her parents were taken to the Theresienstadt ghetto in northern Bohemia where they stayed until the end of the war. Following the ghetto's liberation in 1945, Judy's family went back to Prague for a brief time. From Prague they traveled to Germany and then to England until they immigrated to the United States in 1948.

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Original Format: Video   OCLC#: 0

Seltzer, Sam November 29, 1982

An interview with Sam Seltzer, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Anita Schwartz. Sam Seltzer was born in Modzurów, Poland. Sam's family consisted of his mother, father and five siblings. Following the outbreak of the war, his mother and siblings attempted to flee east to the Russian border. They were unable to complete their journey, instead staying with Sam's older sister in the small town of Zawiercie. After a brief time, Sam returned to Modzurów, until he was rounded-up by the Germans and placed in a number of forced- labor camps, including Sosnowiec, Klettendorf, Geppersdorf, Brande, Graeditz, Faulbrück and Annaberg. In 1944, Sam was sent to Auschwitz. After several weeks in Birkenau, Sam volunteered to work as a mechanic and was sent to a labor Kommando attached to Buchenwald. Sam was liberated in Buchenwald in April 1945. After liberation, Sam was hospitalized in Feldafing, Germany where he was reunited with his brother and the two emigrated to the United States.

Original Format: video   OCLC#: 55802454

Shlanger, Martin March 4, 1983

Martin Shlanger was born in Vel'ke Kapusany, Czechoslovakia. He moved to Budapest in 1942 to work in a factory. In March 1944 the Germans occupied the city. Mr. Shlanger acquired false papers but was soon identified as a Jew and arrested. He was sent to Jaworzno, a sub-camp in the Auschwitz system. In 1945, he survived a death march to Blechhammer as the Russian army invaded the area. Because he hid when the Germans left Blechhammer, he was left behind at the camp and eventually encountered the Soviet army. He was reunited for a short time with his brother, who was serving with the Czechoslovak Brigade in the Soviet army. Martin returned to his hometown where he lived until 1949 when he immigrated to Detroit, Michigan.

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Original Format: video   OCLC#: 36450713

Shloss, Felicia February 9, 1983

Felicia Shloss was born in Piotrkow, Poland. Felicia and her family moved to Łódź when she was a teenager. When the war started, she and her family were forced in the ghetto, where her parents and brother eventually died. After the ghetto's liquidation, Felicia and her remaining two siblings were taken to Auschwitz. From there, Felicia and her sister were taken to Bergen-Belsen and then Salzwedel, where they worked in an ammunition factory. After being liberated in Salzwedel, she married and moved to the United States.

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Original Format: video   OCLC#: 708331492

Tanay, Emanuel March 16, 1987

Although he was born in Vilna in 1928, Dr. Emanuel Tanay spent the pre-war years in Miechow, a small community south of Krakow, Poland. During the occupation, his family lived in the Miechow ghetto until Tanay, his mother and sister escaped just before it was liquidated. His father did not escape and was later executed by Amon Goeth. Tanay spent part of the war living in a monastery "hidden" as a novice and "converted Jew." He later used false Aryan papers as he moved around Poland and Hungary.

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Original Format: video   OCLC#: 32104103

Water, Martin 1982

Martin Water was born in Łódź, Poland. In September 1939, he and his family fled to Warsaw. Food was scarce in Warsaw and so Martin traveled alone back to Łódź to buy food and was trapped inside the ghetto. He worked at the ghetto's shoe factory until 1944 when he was taken to Auschwitz. While in Auschwitz, he volunteered to join a work detail at Gleiwitz IV and was later transferred to Blechhammer. POHSurvPage.aspx?svid=366

Original Format: video   OCLC#: 670529507

Webber, Ruth Muschkies February 2, 1987

Ruth Webber was about 5 years old when the war started. Her family was first moved into the Ostrowiec ghetto and then lived in the following camps; Bodzechow, Sandomierz, Starachowice, Austrovietz, Annopol and finally Auschwitz. Her mother survived the war but her father died on the last transport out of Auschwitz. Ruth was in the children's block of Auschwitz when it was liberated by the Russians on Jan. 27, 1945.

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Original Format: video   OCLC#: 31674068

Webber, Mark December 13, 2004

Mark Webber was born in Pułtusk, Poland on March 29, 1928. In 1939, Mark and his family were forced by the Germans out of Pułtusk and marched to Białystok. From there, the Russians took the family to a town in Northern Russia where they performed forced labor. Eventually the Russians moved the family to Uzbekistan where they stayed for the remainder of the war. After the war the family moved back to Poland with the intent to move to Palestine. However, after losing his parents, Mark decided to move to the United States.

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Original Format: video   OCLC#: 670528775

Weiss, Michael August 9, 1995

Born in Kascony, Czechoslovakia, Michael Weiss chronicles his experiences under the Czechoslovakians, Hungarians, and Germans, both prior to and during, the Second World War. Mr. Weiss and his family were shipped to the Hungarian ghetto of Beregszasz (Berehovo) in 1944. From Beregszasz, the family was deported to Auschwitz, where his mother was gassed by the Germans. From Auschwitz, Weiss and his father were sent to Buchenwald and then on to Zeitz, located approximately fifteen miles south of Leipzig in Central Germany.

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Original Format: video   OCLC#: 45242655

Weiss, Shari April 17, 1985

Shari Weiss was born in Harina, a small village in Romania. When she was eight or nine, Shari went to live with an aunt and uncle in Cluj where she stayed until 1944 when the Germans occupied Hungary. In May 1944 they were transported to Auschwitz after staying at a transit camp in a brick factory for three weeks. Shari describes her life at Auschwitz where she and her aunt stayed for about five months before they were taken to a labor camp in Altenburg, Germany. She worked in a factory until April 1945 when the inmates were marched out of the camp. Shari and her aunt were liberated by the American army two days later. Shari's uncle did not survive the war.

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Original Format: video   OCLC#: 32298954

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